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The Student Voice of Prosper High School

Eagle Nation Online

The Student Voice of Prosper High School

Eagle Nation Online

The Student Voice of Prosper High School

Eagle Nation Online

Texas law serves disciplinary action for vaping

Officials explain ‘1-strike’ policy for students who violate rule
A+graphic+design+made+on+Canva%2C+illustrates+Stop%2C+think+before+you+vape.+Texas+passed+House+Bill+114%2C+which+sends+students+immediately+to+disciplinary+school+if+caught+with+a+vape+or+e-cigarette.+This+applies+to+all+Texas+public+schools.+
Juliana Cruz
A graphic design made on Canva, illustrates “Stop, think before you vape.” Texas passed House Bill 114, which sends students immediately to disciplinary school if caught with a vape or e-cigarette. This applies to all Texas public schools.

Texas passed House Bill 114 May 26. It states: “A student must be removed from class and placed into a disciplinary alternative education program, or expelled for the possession, use or delivery of drugs on or near public school campus.” School district faculty and families have been notified of the new law, which went into effect Sept. 1.

Stimulants are a category of drug that increase activity in the central nervous system, speeding up messages from the brain to the body. Nicotine is a type of stimulant. Along with nicotine and THC, Tetrahydrocannabinol, — both highly addictive drugs — vapes can contain compounds like formaldehyde, cadmium and heavy metals. The severity of the harm caused by this product that’s being marketed to young people has driven the state legislature to take action.

I understand why administration would want to have this new policy since they do want our school to be one of the best and become an example to other districts. The policy can also come off as harsh and ruin a kid’s future based off a mistake they made as a teenager.

— senior Sophia Anglada

Bill 114 applies not only to school campuses, but to any area within 300 feet of school property and any school sponsored event or activity. The disciplinary actions outlined in the bill apply to students caught using, possessing, selling or intoxicated by vapes or e-cigarettes.

Prosper ISD police officers play a crucial role in preventing students from abusing vapes and electronic cigarettes.

“There is still criminal and administrative punishment,” officer Ben Boerhaave said. “The lowest level of the criminal offense is a fine, plus the administrative side, which is 30 days of DAEP.”

According to officer Cary Noiel, they handle students caught with possession of vapes the same way as done before.

“I will issue a minor possession charge if it is just a vape pen and handle,” Noiel said. “The school is the one who dishes out the punishment for DAEP placement, not us.”

As he discussed the new policy, Prosper High School Principal Nicholas Jones explained how it will affect Prosper and other districts as a whole.

I do believe the policy is needed, as it is unhealthy for students to adopt the negative habit. Vaping is still a new form of inhaling substances, so it should be taken seriously when a student is caught.

— senior Mia Solis

“I don’t think we could have stuck to what we were doing if the point was to change behavior,” Jones said. “Now they’re trying to help a different way. I’m glad they did something because I know what were doing before wasn’t working.”

Jones said the consequences of being caught with drugs for extracurriculars and college admissions can be severe.

“If you’re involved in anything, that’s all gone — especially for college,” Jones said. “On your college transcript, it will be written that you were suspended from school for six weeks.”

With the expansion of the school district, Jones said the policy with affect Prosper High.

“I don’t love when our kids aren’t here (PHS). I want our kids to be on campus,” Jones said. “It’s illegal, and you’re purposely doing it (vaping) here. There has to be some sort of response, and I think that will help limit the amount of kids using vape.”

Teachers also have a responsibility to hold students accountable if they are caught with a vape.

“They want to help. They don’t ever want to take their students and throw them out of class for 30 days,” Jones said. “It’s not necessarily what that kid is learning, but how their life progresses and the lessons they learn as they get older. The six weeks will help them with that.”

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About the Contributor
Juliana Cruz
Juliana Cruz, Co-Editor-in-Chief
Juliana Cruz, a former native New Yorker, is a senior at Prosper High School. This is her second year working for Eagle Nation Online and she serves as social media manager, news editor and Editor in Chief. She enjoys writing and wants to continue to expand her coverage. Outside of school and work, she is on the powerlifting team and spends her time with family.
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