Students, teachers clean up school with new recycling program

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Students, teachers clean up school with new recycling program

The recycling program continues its second year at the high school. Engineering teacher Donald Berliner and special education teacher Logan Bass started the program last year to help clean up the school.

The recycling program continues its second year at the high school. Engineering teacher Donald Berliner and special education teacher Logan Bass started the program last year to help clean up the school. "Students can help with the program most importantly by paying attention and throwing the correct items in the recycling bins," Bass said. "If you have cans or bring drinks in cans, make sure you recycle these so we can earn money for our school."

Sydney Washburn

The recycling program continues its second year at the high school. Engineering teacher Donald Berliner and special education teacher Logan Bass started the program last year to help clean up the school. "Students can help with the program most importantly by paying attention and throwing the correct items in the recycling bins," Bass said. "If you have cans or bring drinks in cans, make sure you recycle these so we can earn money for our school."

Sydney Washburn

Sydney Washburn

The recycling program continues its second year at the high school. Engineering teacher Donald Berliner and special education teacher Logan Bass started the program last year to help clean up the school. "Students can help with the program most importantly by paying attention and throwing the correct items in the recycling bins," Bass said. "If you have cans or bring drinks in cans, make sure you recycle these so we can earn money for our school."

Haley Medeiros

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Engineering teacher Donald Berliner and special education teacher Logan Bass created the recycling program last year to clean the school, the environment and get students involved. Now, Berliner said it is, “rising like a phoenix.”

The program consists of 18-plus high school students as well as teachers and staff. The goal is to make the school a little bit greener.

“The recycling program was started for two reasons,” Bass said. “One, we realized how much was going to waste at the school and wanted to do something about it. Two, it was a great opportunity for my students to get involved and help them practice vocational skills that will help them after they graduate high school.”

The program will officially start up this semester.

“We have a lot of teachers that want to help and stress recycling in their rooms,” Berliner said. “The 18-plus students are big help in keeping things going.”

New recycling and waste procedures will be put in place for classrooms.

“There will be signs posted and commercials on ENN to explain what can and cannot be recycled,” Bass said. “We will also need the help of classroom teachers to make sure these rules are followed.”

Berliner said the recycling program might give a presentation during Eagle Time about how students can help in the future.

“With the blessing of Dr. Burdett, we hope to do a program next year to inform students of everything about recycling,” Berliner said. “We hope after the presentation things will be cleared up about what can and should be recycled.”

Bass said recycling has benefits beyond cleaning up the environment.

“Students can help with the program most importantly by paying attention and throwing the correct items in the recycling bins,” Bass said. “If you have cans or bring drinks in cans, make sure you recycle these so we can earn money for our school.”

Students can contact Bass or Berliner to help collect recycling bins in classrooms.

“We are hoping to add to the simple idea of recycling by making students more aware and actually try and reduce the amount of items that need to be recycled,” Berliner said.  “It is scary to see the amounts of things being dumped in our oceans and rivers. Plastic was an amazing development, but the damage because of it is horrible.”

Bass and Berliner said students can help by putting the correct items in the recycling bin, which includes cans, plastic, and paper.

“Recycling is important, because our school has a lot of trash,” sophomore Kaitlyn Cyranowicz said. “If we clean up, our school won’t be like a landfill.”