Club Spotlight: Schools unite to celebrate, induct artists in honor society

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Soomin Chung

Clapping for the new inductees, Madison Woodard shares the society flower, a red carnation, with them. Woodard is a former member of National Art Honor Society who earned “Gold Seal” at the Texas Art Education Association Visual Arts Scholastic Event four years ago with her piece called “Sea Dragon.” Former students, their parents, as well as district staff attended the ceremony. “I thought we were able to make it more elegant this year with the table settings,” sponsor Judy Seay said. “For me, that kind of compensated for what we missed out on as far as personal togetherness. I felt like we were able to compensate by going into slightly more elegant settings with tablecloths and centerpieces. It was more like a banquet as opposed to receptions.”

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As they light the candles on the tables, families entered the Rock Hill High School Cafeteria with their students to attend the National Art Honor Society induction ceremony. The Prosper and Rock Hill NAHS held their joint induction ceremony Jan. 14.

With the COVID-19 guidelines regarding after-school events, the officers and sponsors adjusted the ceremony format from previous years. Sponsor teacher of Prosper NAHS Judy Seay highlighted challenges they experienced.

“We had to have it in the cafeteria instead of the auditorium, and snacks had to be individually packaged,” Seay said. “People couldn’t sit together. They had to be apart. I don’t think we had as many opportunities to visit. Usually, I have a lot of conversations with parents and students, and I think because of COVID, we didn’t have the opportunity to do that.”

As social-distancing guidelines restricted large-group gatherings, the two groups found another way to bring the community together.

“I thought we were able to make it more elegant this year with the table settings,” Seay said. “For me, that kind of compensated for what we missed out on as far as personal togetherness. I felt like we were able to compensate by going into slightly more elegant settings with tablecloths and centerpieces. It was more like a banquet as opposed to receptions.”

One of the parent attendees, Amy Pedersen said she had three favorite parts of the ceremony.

“I loved the candle ceremony, recognizing volunteers and focusing on what art brings to the world,”  Pedersen said.

A senior member of Prosper NAHS, Abigail Aguwa, highlighted the process of preparing for the banquet-style ceremony.

“It was extremely different,” Aguwa said. “I can’t say it was much more difficult though. I think it ran very smoothly. It was put together very well. Everything was extensively thought out.”

Prosper NAHS secretary Gillian Diel said the members worked together to create an event that honored inductees and followed guidelines to prevent the spread of COVID-19.

“We made the best of what we had,” Diel said.  “I think it was a great night.”