Adjusted ‘Eagle Time’ period
provides athletes with chance
to improve in classroom

Volleyball+players+take+advantage+of+their+time+in+the+arena+during+Eagle+Time%2C+which+begins+at+9%3A50+each+morning+after+first+period+on+A+days+and+fifth+period+on+B+days.+All+athletes+report+to+the+arena+for+this+study+hall+period%2C+and+coaches+are+available+to+help+them+with+their+studies.+I+like+Eagle+Time.+I+think+its+helpful%2C+cross+country+runner+Spencer+Marcum+said.

Aaron Boateng

Volleyball players take advantage of their time in the arena during Eagle Time, which begins at 9:50 each morning after first period on A days and fifth period on B days. All athletes report to the arena for this study hall period, and coaches are available to help them with their studies. “I like Eagle Time. I think it’s helpful,” cross country runner Spencer Marcum said.

Reading Time: 3 minutes
Student-athletes and their coaches are required to meet in the arena for the schoolwide study hall, ‘Eagle Time’. “I think if the kids are using their time wisely, it’s an opportunity for them to do 20 to 25 minutes worth of homework. Now, when they go home at night, it’s a little bit less on their plate,” coach Brandon Schmidt said. Eagle Time is 30 minutes a day,  beginning at 9:50 each morning.

With the school’s new schedule layout, students around campus have adjusted to the new ‘Eagle Time’ format this school year. Instead of this study session taking place in the afternoon, it takes place in the morning after first period on A days and fifth period on B days. Students also are limited to going to a classroom for tutorials or to staying in the cafeteria and/or library to study. However, the athletes may have the biggest adjustment of all students. Athletes and their coaches are required to meet in the arena for ‘Eagle Time’ each day.

“I think if the kids are using their time wisely, it’s an opportunity for them to do 20 to 25 minutes worth of homework,” coach Brandon Schmidt said. “Now, when they go home at night, it’s a little bit less on their plate.”

The change provides student-athletes with extra time to catch up on school work in the middle of their hectic schedules. Every member of a UIL sport is required to take part in the session in the arena unless they have other tutorials to attend. However, for sports not directly affiliated with the school like lacrosse, archery and bowling, that’s a different story.

“Those are considered clubs,” Prosper ISD Athletic Director Valerie Little said. “The sports we deal with here are UIL sports.”

Pullquote Photo

I think if the kids are using their time wisely, it’s an opportunity for them to do 20 to 25 minutes worth of homework. Now, when they go home at night, it’s a little bit less on their plate.”

— coach Brandon Schmidt

Another reason why administrators and coaches believe this time is useful is the presence of coaches in the arena. Almost every coach is required to be in attendance to help their athletes, with just a few exceptions.

“Unless they [coaches] are required to be in their classroom,” Little said. “We have some [coaches] that might be physics or high-level math teachers, and they go to their classrooms for tutoring instead of the arena.”

The student-athletes remain the focal point of this move to the arena for Eagle Time. Although he sees this time as beneficial, senior cross-country runner Spencer Marcum wishes Eagle Time in the arena was a little more organized.

“I like Eagle Time. I think it’s helpful,” Marcum said. “But, I think it can be situated a little better.”

Students may be a little skeptical of the move at first because it means change. Nevertheless, coach Schmidt said he believes this time will ultimately be productive if everyone involved does their part.

“I think overall it’s a great thing if we use it the right way and take advantage of it,” Schmidt said. “Sometimes they need to be in tutorials if they need help in class or they need to retake a test or make up a test, and I think that’s great.”