New assistant principal achieves several firsts

Dr. Lute Croy sets goal to be role model

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Juliana Cruz

Walking around, Dr. Lute Croy monitors the lunchroom. Dr. Croy anticipates the school year, and hopes to lead the students to success. “I want to be a part of in some way, helping develop the next generation of leaders.” Croy said. “We help each other grow as leaders.”

Juliana Cruz, Reporter

Reading Time: 2 minutes

Whether he’s moving desks or earning degrees, Lute Croy, a new assistant principal, gets the job done.

Dr. Croy shares his journey about the pathway from Abilene Christian University to Prosper, and how he’s leaping into setting goals for the district in the future.

Dr. Croy set a goal to be a role model for his kids, as he was the first member of his family to graduate with not just a high school diploma, but also a masters degree.

I’m the first person in my family to graduate from high school, the first person to go to college, the first person to get a master’s degree, and all those things — so it feels great,” Dr. Croy said. “One of my kids gets to see that change — where I grew up to where I am, and that my family gets to celebrate in that as well.”

Receiving his doctorates was strange yet rewarding process to Dr. Croy. It was a time to focus on something he was truly passionate about. 

“It’s hard to get the motivation to do assignments you don’t really care about,” Dr. Croy said. “Going through this program, I knew I wanted to focus on this particular thing, so it stayed interesting the whole time.”

The process of building relations along the way made assignments easier for him to achieve.

“You’re taking courses, and you’re learning about a wide range of things. And then, it starts to narrow as you go along,” Dr. Croy said. “And, if you don’t build relationships along the way, then you’re kind of just cold calling.” 

Dr. Croy’s philosophy is to never gives up on the process – no matter the goal nor the position.

“I want to be a part of helping develop the next generation of leaders to step into those positions. Part of that is just in investing in our staff here, but some of us are brand new here in this building,” Dr. Croy said. “We help each other grow as leaders.”

Dr. Croy wants to improve relationships between students and teachers.

“We need to be able to provide intervention and to the students who need it most,” Dr. Croy said. “We’re gonna be able to do that with the structure that we’re going to be using Eagle Time for.”

Dr. Croy aims to be a model PLC school district with the help of all PISD Alphas. Each assistant principal is assigned a group of students to work with, depending on the students’ last names.

“Our teachers all kind of grow together and learn from each other,” Dr. Croy said. “We help each other grow as leaders.”

Other administrators express appreciation towards Dr. Croy’s ideas.

“I have been just completely impressed and amazed at the way he cares for students,” superintendent Holly Ferguson said. “And his work ethic. He has really gone above and beyond.”

Dr. Croy works efficiently with students in meetings.

“He was very willing to listen and take initiative to the issues involved,” Senior Kristyn Mackenzie said. “He responded quickly and did his best to help out.”

Dr. Croy rushes to help other educators.

“He came running in to help the teachers near me,” Journalism and Digital Media teacher Lisa Roskens said. “Mr. Jones was also working with him. They seem to make a really good team.”

This article recieved updates for additional clarity from Jake Radcliffe and Juliana Cruz. It was last updated at 5:24 p.m. Sept. 7.